• Burrowing owl

    Burrowing owls were once a common sight in southern BC.

  • Arrowleaf owl

    Burrowing owls are losing habitat every year

  • owly owl

    Help us save this endangered species

BURROWING OWL CONSERVATION SOCIETY of BC

We build and maintain nesting burrows in conservation areas for burrowing owls. Most of our conservation work is done on private land. None of this would be possible without the support and interest of landowners.We are grateful for their continued participation.
If you would like to donate land or participate as a partner in our conservation program, please email us bocsbc@gmail.com


Owls are raised and cared for by trained staff in dedicated breeding facilities. The birds have spacious flight pens and high quality food allowing them to have the greatest chance of success before release to the wild. These centres are far apart in order to protect the birds in case of disease or disaster. They are located at: Kamloops, Port Kells and Oliver.
After a year in the breeding facility young owls are tagged, paired and released to a nestiing burrow in the wild. We monitor their success and report to BC government. If you see a burrowing owl in the wild we would love to hear about it and see any photograph that you may have taken. Please let us know. Include details of the location, time, date, weather conditions and what the bird was doing. If you took a photograph please include it. Tell us if you noticed any bands or coloured marking on the legs.
We support and promote educational and interpretation programs to inspire future generations who will conserve these iconic grassland birds.Our brochure with conservation information is available for download.

Our Activities

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Maintaining breeders

conservation
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Raising Eggs and Chicks

Education
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Rearing Juveniles

Education
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Feeding and care

Volunteering
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Banding and recording

Help & Support
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Pairing for release

conservation
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Releasing owls

conservation
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Monitoring hatching success

Help & Support
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Digging new nests

Volunteering
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Building and Maintaining Facilities

Volunteering
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Educating Community

Education
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Locating new sites

Help & Support

OUTREACH

Read the current edition of Pellet Post Newsletter
Spring/Summer 2021.
Back issues of Pellet Post with burrowing owl news and conservation information can be viewd here:
Archived Pellet Post newsletters 
Lauren and our ambassador owl are available to visit schools and community events to help raise awareness of the significance of burrowing owls and the importance of conserving grasslands. If you have an event or want to help us fundraise, please contact us bocsbc@gmail.com

Owls in the News

Digging for Owls

Fun Facts

  • Burrows

    Burrowing owls do not live in trees.

    They nest in the disused burrows of badgers, marmots and ground squirrels.

    They will even use artificial burrows in the ground

  • Decorations

    Male burrowing owls decorate the entrance of the burrow with items to attract a mate. He collects objects like bones, pebbles, colourful ribbon.

  • Active

    Unlike other owls, burrowing owls are active in the daytime as well as at night.

    They hunt most frequently at sunrise and sunset.

  • Dung

    Male burrowing owls spread animal dung at the entrance of their burrow.

    The smell attracts beetles and other insects which the owls catch without leaving home.

  • Mimicry

    Baby owls mimic the sound of a rattlesnake to scare off predators.

  • Gender

    Male and female burrowing owls look the same. The best way to tell them apart is to look at their DNA. This is done using a sample of their feather.

Meet our Field Team

Lauren Meads

Executive Director

Lauren is passionate about animals and has Master's of Science in Applied Animal Behaviour from the University of Edinburgh Scotland. She has a great commitment to the conservation of burrowing owls.

Lia McKinnon

Field Biologist

Lia has been with the project for several years and confidently handles owls and their chicks as part of the spring and summer field program. 

Charyl Omelchuk

Field Biologist

Charyl works with the burrowing owl program in Kamloops. Her owl catching skills are unsurpassed and she is an asset to the program

Tracy Reynolds

BC Wildlife Park

Tracy is Animal Care Supervisor at BCWP. She looks after the burrowing owl captive breeding program in Kamloops.

OUR SPONSORS

Burrowing Owl Estate Winery

Burrowing Owl Estate Winery

BC Government

BC Government

Canadian Government

Canadian Government

Nature Conservancy of Canada

NCC

Telus Community Grants

Telus

TD Friends of the Environment

TD FEF

BC Government Community Gaming Grants

BC Government Community Gaming Grants

Private Donors

NCC

World Wildlife Fund Canada

World Wildlife Fund Canada

1% for the Planet

One percent for the planet

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OUR CONSERVATION COOPERATORS

Nature Trust of BC

Nature Trust BC

Upper Nicola Band

Upper Nicola Band

Penticton Indian Band

Penticton Indian Band

Wildlife Preservation Canada

Wildlife Preservation Canada

Our Partners

Calgary Zoo

Calgary Zoo

BC Wildlife Park

BCWP

Global Owl Project

Global Owl Project

Canadian Wildlife Service, Alberta

CWS

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Mike Mackintosh - Chair of the board and Founder

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Jim Wyse - Vice Chair, Finance and Fundraising Director

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Elaine Humphrey - Secretary and Education Director

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Aimee Mitchell - Science Director

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Tracy Reynolds - Captive Director

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Cliff Lemire - Volunteer and Membership Director

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Jack Madryga - Director at Large

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John Gray - Director at Large

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Steve Church - Director at Large

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Adrienne Clay - Director at Large

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Dave Low - Director of Lac Du Bois

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